Keys to Launching a Successful Viral Video – Part 1

A viral video that takes your niche (and maybe the whole Internet) by a storm doesn’t just happen by accident. To maximize your chances of creating the video that becomes an overnight sensation, you need to execute this two-part plan:

-Part 1: Create a buzz-worthy video
-Part 2: Launch your video

Here’s how to do it…

Step 1: Choose a Topic Worth Sharing

Go to YouTube and see what’s hot. Which videos are popular and get a lot of views, comments and viral action? Chances are, the popular videos tend to be funny, outrageous, controversial, offensive, extremely useful or similar.

Look, if you want to create a video that everyone talks about, then you need to make it WORTH talking about. And that means making it different, engaging, useful, funny, controversial and/or offensive.

Step 2: Create Your Video

You don’t have to buy fancy equipment, but you shouldn’t a camera that films grainy pictures either. Upgrade your equipment to the best you can afford so you can present a quality product.

Second, keep it SHORT – just 30 seconds to two minutes maximum. Videos go viral when they’re short and easy to watch… and easy to pass along.

Step 3: Keep Track of the Important Frames

Your first, last or middle frame should be visually appealing. That’s because YouTube allows you to use one of those frames as a thumbnail pic – and you want to create a thumbnail pic that captures attention (and clicks) from YouTube users.

Step 4: Load and Tag

Finally, you need to load your video up, describe it, and “tag” it using the keywords your niche uses to find related information. Ideally, you should use some long-tail keywords so that your niche can easily find your video both on YouTube as well as in Google.

Once you’ve completed the above four easy steps, you’re halfway done. Your next step is to officially launch your video and get it in front of as many people as possible. You’ll discover exactly how to do that in Part 2 of this article series.

4 Things That Real World Product Managers Do

What do product managers really spend their time doing? We like to talk about all of the things that tthey should be spending their time doing – boldly defining new products and clearly laying out markets to go after. However, the day-to-day reality of being a product manager can be quite different. The folks over at Pragmatic Marketing have just released their annual survey and it contains some interesting points…

Roadmaps

If ever there was a part of a product that a product manager should own, the roadmap is it. Just to make sure that we’re all on the same page here, a product roadmap lays out the changes and enhancements that are planned for your product in the future. You get to define the future: is it just this month, this year, or do you go out for 5 years?

Although we should own the product’s roadmap, this is not always an easy thing to do. Development teams have been known to want to play a big role in saying what shows up in the product and when it shows up.

The reason that this is the wrong way to handle things is that for your product to be successful, it really needs to be your customers who are defining in what order (and when) features are introduced. Who owns the roadmap can be the source of many battles within the firm.

Requirements

When people ask me what skills a product manager needs to have, at the top of my list is the ability to communicate clearly. Nowhere is this more evident than when it comes to product requirements.

You own the requirements for your products. Normally, the creation of product requirements is not something that people fight over. I mean, who really wants to do all of that writing?

The key skill that you need to have is the ability to both clearly and succinctly express what the product needs to be able to do. This has to be done for multiple simultaneous audiences: the sales teams need to be able to read it and understand what’s coming and the development teams need to be able to read it and understand what they need to do.

Market Problems

In a world without problems, there probably wouldn’t be much of a need for product managers. Thankfully there are a lot of problems out there! I’m not sure if “problems” is really the right word to use here, I think that “changes” might be closer to the mark…

When we create and launch a product, we do so in a market that has certain characteristics: we know who our customers are and we know who we are competing against. From that moment on everything changes.

As things change, it is your responsibility to change with it. We need to adapt our products, our marketing message, and perhaps even our pricing to deal with the new realities as they show up.

Positioning

What does your product do? Who does it do it for it? Why should your customers choose your product over somebody else’s? These are all great questions and if you don’t have a solid answer for each of them, things are not looking good for your product.

Knowing how you want people to view your product against all of their other options is a key point that product managers have to take care of. This higher level ability to “see” your product as the market does is very important.

Since we are dealing with an ever changing market, your product positioning will always be changing also. This means that as a product manager you need to always be “looking” at your product and making marketing adjustments to it.

What All Of This Means For You

It’s not easy being a product manager. There is no such thing as a product that just “runs on auto pilot”. Instead, every day we need to be making adjustments to both our products and how we market them in order to ensure that they will be successful.

A recent survey shows that product managers spend a lot of their time working on four main tasks. These tasks are: creating roadmaps, defining requirements, dealing with market “problems”, and ensuring that their products are properly positioned.

If we can master these activities, then we’ll have the core of what it means to be a great product manager taken care of. That being said, it’s not easy being a product manager; however, at least now you know what’s required!

How Do I Register a Business in Singapore

Most entrepreneurs, when they opt for a Singapore business registration, start a private limited company. However, depending on your business needs, the risk involved, and the liability you are ready to commit to, you can also use other business structures.

Choose the Right Legal Structure

In addition to a private limited company, you can also form your business as a Sole Proprietorship or Limited Liability Partnership (LLP). You need to be careful here, as your choice can impact your liability and tax amount. It can also affect a business’ tax amount, branding, credibility, and fundraising ability.

Singapore government helps new businesses in their initial days. The government offers them various grants and tax incentive and help them take roots. The low corporate tax rate lowers their overhead costs. This support gives them a breathing space to find a foothold or a niche to cling to.

You can claim these benefits for your business only if it is a locally registered private limited company. You also need to maintain their management in Singapore.

How to Register a Private Limited Company

You need to apply to the Company Registrar of Singapore to register your company. A government agency named Accounting and Corporate Regulatory Authority (ACRA) acts in this capacity.

For your Singapore business registration, a company or a business firm like a sole proprietorship or an LLP, you need to apply to ACRA. If you are a foreigner, you can appoint a Singapore business registration services provider to take care of the task.

The process for Singapore company registration is streamlined and has only two procedures.

Get company name approved from ACRA
Apply to ACRA for your company registration
1# Get Company Name Approved from ACRA

You need to choose a unique, meaningful, and decent company name. It will improve the chance of getting it approved by the ACRA. If you have appointed an agent to form your business, send them a list of 3-7 company names.

Their experts will check the names for availability on the ACRA’s website. They will register the available company name by paying an official fee of S$15.

2# Apply for Singapore Company Registration

ACRA acts as the Company Registrar of Singapore. And you need to apply to ACRA to register your business. You must submit all incorporation and KYC documents along with your application. You also must pay an official fee of S$300 in processing fee.

ACRA may take 1-3 days to process your application. After the successful Singapore business registration, ACRA sends you an email. You can use it as an Incorporation Certificate in Singapore. It contains details of your newly registered company like; Unique Entity Number (UEN), business profile, Etc.

If ACRA forwards your application to a Ministry, it may delay the approval by up to 2 months.

Pre-Incorporation Requirements

Before you decide to initiate the Singapore business registration process, you must fulfill a few of the pre-incorporation criteria. They are as listed below:

Company Shareholders

You need at least one shareholder to start your private limited company. It can have up to 50 shareholders. A shareholder in a company can also be its director.

An individual, a company, or a trust can be a shareholder in a Singapore company. If you are the sole foreign shareholder, then Singapore allows you 100% shareholding in your company.

Local or Resident Director

You need to appoint at least one resident director who is ordinarily a resident of Singapore. You can appoint a Singaporean citizen, permanent resident, or an entrepreneur or employment pass holder.

You must also see that the appointee is over 18 years of age and is not bankrupt or has a criminal history.

Company Secretary

As per the Company Act, you must appoint at least one company secretary within six months of the formation of your company. You need to select a qualified and experienced individual who knows the Company’s Law and is ordinarily a resident of Singapore.

You can appoint a Singaporean or permanent resident or a holder of employment, entrepreneur, S, or a dependent pass. A sole director of a company cannot be its company secretary.

Minimum Initial Paid-Up Capital

You need S$1 in the minimum initial paid-up capital for your Singapore business registration. You can increase the company’s capital at any point in time after the formation of your company.

Local Registered Address

You must provide a registered physical address in Singapore for your company office. It has to be an address of a residential or commercial place. P.O. box address is not valid.

Simplify Your Singapore Business Registration

Many local business owners appoint a Singapore business registration services provider for the task. Many a time, they choose a registered filing agent.

These agents are authorized to interact with government agencies, submit documents, and pay the official charges. They have incorporation experts to advise you on your business formation and simplify it.

If you do not have a local director, your provider can arrange a nominee director. You can also pay these firms for a local registered address or a company secretary. They may also assist you in opening a corporate bank account for your new company.

Singapore is a great business hub to start your new business. It ranks in 2nd place for the ‘Ease of Doing Business.’ It is the reason why Singapore business registration is popular. It is a fast process, and you need only 1-3 days to form a new business in Singapore.